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Cancer cure will be ready in a year – Israeli Scientists

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attends the weekly cabinet meeting in Jerusalem, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. (Ronen Zvulun/Pool Photo via AP)

By Paul W Dennis

A team of Israeli scientists say they have made a stride towards the first “complete cure” for cancer and that it will be ready within a year, The Jerusalem Post reported on Monday.

Further more, the scientists claim the drug will be brief, cheap, effective and will have no or minimal side-effects.

Last year, the Uganda Cancer Institute (UCI) revealed that the number of new cancer cases registered annually in Uganda shot up by 500, rising from 4,000 in 2016 to 4,500 in 2017.

The Institute added that close to 80 per cent of people who turn up for treatment, come when their cancer is already in advanced stages – stage four, “and it’s difficult to save them.”

“We believe we will offer in a year’s time a complete cure for cancer,” said Dan Aridor, chairman of the board of Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies Ltd. (AEBi) in Israel.

AEBi developed the SoAP platform, which provides functional leads to very difficult targets.

“Our cancer cure will be effective from day one, will last a duration of a few weeks and will have no or minimal side-effects at a much lower cost than most other treatments on the market,” Aridor said. “Our solution will be both generic and personal.”

The biotech company has not yet published any clinical evidence showing this treatment works in humans, according to sources.

CEO Ilan Morad told the Jerusalem Post that AEBi has only finished its first exploratory mice experiment, which he says inhibited cancer cell growth, according to CNBC.

Aridor was quoted as saying the company’s first target is lung cancer and that it’s working on others.

“It can take six to seven years to bring cancer drugs from ‘mouse to market’ even when drugmakers receive special permissions from U.S. regulators to speed drug development,” Les Funtleyder, health-care portfolio manager at E Squared Capital Management, told CNBC.

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